Customer Experience

Customer Experience Strategy and Planning

It is widely cited that attention customer experience is lacking in most organizations. This barrier stifles potential and can greatly harm the health of your business. Implementing customer experience planning and customer experience strategy can greatly increase your ROI.By putting the customer at the core of your business, you will create immense opportunity for growth and development. But how should you go about planning and carrying out these changes? Below, you can learn straight from CX industry professionals about the skills, tools, and resources you need in order to plan an effective strategy that will drive customer satisfaction and the overall success of your business.

How Clear Are Your Instructions?

Have you ever eaten a frozen lunch by Michelina’s? These are inexpensive meals for a quick lunch. To heat it, you open the lid and put it in the microwave. After it has run for 2-3 minutes, stir it and put it back in. But for how long? The cooking directions are on the bottom of the box! If you didn’t memorize the timing before you started, you’re now in the position of either guessing the length of time, or holding it above your head so you can read the directions.

How does this happen? Do Michelina’s employees not eat the food? Do they spend so much time with the meals that they have the directions memorized? Or have they made a deliberate decision to sacrifice the functionality in favor of the branding on the top of the box?

This reminds me of the Tropicana rebranding failure from a few years ago.  You can learn more about it here and here.

To summarize, Pepsi (the owner of Tropicana) released new packaging for Tropicana. It looked okay on a carton-by-carton basis. But what about when you saw it in the store? First, it looked like a store brand. Second, all the versions looked nearly identical. Notice how the original clearly says “No Pulp Original.” Color variations differentiated the varieties, making it easy to shop. Now, look at the new version. Pulp free is there – but you have to look for it. It takes more work than the original. In addition, whereas the original had the iconic orange with a straw in it, the new one looks like a store brand! Imagine 7 varieties of the new carton all lined up together. It makes the shopper work harder.

Just to showcase the issue, I’d love to measure how may Tropicana shoppers actually look for the brand name when they pick up their juice.  I’m certain a sizeable minority just look for the orange. But don’t take my word for it – take the consumers’. Sales dropped by 19% before Pepsi reversed the decision!

This is an interesting product branding discussion. But how can we learn from this in developing our own customer experience?

Let’s examine how the Pepsi decision-makers shop for orange juice. Not the consumers – the people involved with developing the product. Pepsi has a pretty sweet deal for employee purchases. Pepsi provides heavily-discounted beverages for bulk purchase at the headquarters. Why would you ever shop at a grocery store when you could pick it up at work and save yourself a bundle in the process? You wouldn’t.

At first this program seems like a good idea, as it will get employees to drink more of their own products, and they can reinvest that knowledge back into the product development process. From an R&D perspective, that makes a lot of sense.

But this leads to the employees missing the shopping experience. I have no particular insight into the team that decided on the branding. They probably spent a lot of time in stores, and they probably mocked up a store display at headquarters. But did they deliberately put themselves in the customers’ shoes? All signs point to a definite “No.”

Let’s contrast this with Best Buy, where I do have some experience. Best Buy has both an online and a physical store experience. They offer employees a discount to they shop in the stores – but not when they shop online. Why not? Store employees (particularly those near the corporate campus!) would like nothing better than to get those corporate employees out of their stores. So why not send them all online for their purchases?

The answer revolves around customer experience. Best Buy knows that if they offer the discount for online purchases, a substantial number of employees will never go to their stores. As a result, they will never gain that insight that comes from searching through three stores to find that special power cable for their phone. Only by physically walking through the customer’s steps can you gain the insight needed to create a great customer experience. Best Buy knows this. Pepsi didn’t.

What are you doing to make sure that you have a deep understanding of your customer’s experience?

Seeing through your customers’ eyes

It’s not easy to think like a customer. In Made to Stick, the Heath Brothers talk about “The Curse of Knowledge.” We often know so much about a topic that we simply can’t understand the perspective of those who don’t know as much.

This is critical to keep in mind as you develop your customer experience. We get so accustomed to the way things are that it takes a very deliberate effort to step back and see it from a customer’s perspective.  Over-featured phones, sales-prevention processes and convulated forms are constant reminders of what happens when you design the experience from a company-centric eye.

Seeing things through the customer’s eye is clearly critical to developing a successful experience. The challenge is:  how do I do it?  And how do I get the rest of my company to think this way?

Retailers have a fairly easy to watch customers shop. But that doesn’t mean they necessarily do it.  In Why We Buy, Paco Underhill tells a story about working with Macy’s. While they were investigating a different part of the store, their cameras also picked up a tie rack on the race track, and they saw something amazing. Particularly on busy days, customers would browse for ties until somebody walked close behind them and accidentally brushed their backside as they went by – what Underhill called “butt brush.” Once customers (especially women) experienced butt brush they immediately abandoned shopping. Once the problem was spotted, the response was easy. Macy’s moved the tie rack and sales increased immediately!

But how many store associates walked by that tie rack every day? If you take the time, you will realize that there are dozens of ways to improve the customer experience right in front of you. But we’re often so busy running the business that we miss simple opportunities to improve our customer’s lives, and thus our results.

Retailers have no excuse for these types of problems. In the Lund’s example from my earlier post, how much effort does it take to walk a store and look for problems? But how often do we do it? Clearly, not often enough!

But this opportunity extends far beyond retail. Almost every service business has its own way of going “undercover customer.” While the watching cannot always be literal, customers share their experience in more ways than you might expect. Intuit developed its software by following people home to watch them install it, recording every misstep or issue along the way.  At a healthcare financial services provider we “watched” our customers by matching behavioral data with demographics to get a better understanding of who was opening accounts and how they saved or spent their dollars.  Clickstreams are another example – who is using your website, and how? Where do they come from, and where do they go next?  Use inductive reasoning to look for trends, and use these to improve your customer experience.

Watching customers helps you understand what they actually do, breaking your myths about your customers’ behavior.  Have you watched your customers today?

Soft Rock Does Not Always Mean a Great Customer Experience

My local Lund’s grocery store offers a mostly-great shopping experience. Good produce, nice staff. But there’s one element of the experience that absolutely drives me crazy.

They contracted with Big Bowl to provide Chinese food, which is a great idea. Customers can stop in, grab supper, and likely pick up a few groceries while there. Genius! So, what’s the problem?

For whatever reason, while the rest of the store plays one soft rock station, Big Bowl plays its own DIFFERENT soft rock station! That results in an area in the store where you hear both stations. And there’s nothing worse than hearing two different soft rock songs at the same time!

Actually, there is one thing worse. One day when I was shopping, both stations were playing the same song – but out of sync! Imagine hearing “Billy, don’t be a hero” in one ear, “The soldier blues were trapped on a hillside” on the other!

So, what happened, and how has this continued for over a year now (despite several requests to fix it)? Does the store manager not care? Is he/she so overwhelmed with managing the store that there’s no time to pay attention to the customer experience? Or has the manager become so attuned to the annoyance that it’s faded into the background?

This is what this blog is all about. Especially in a down economy, superior products and services are no longer enough.  You need to provide a better experience than your competitors, in order to build that emotional engagement that will keep your customers loyal when your competitors send out their latest sales ad.

Creating that experience that resonates with your customers requires that you go beyond the research to truly understand their experience.  Try on the customer’s shoes.  Experience your product or services like they do.  And ask them questions – tons of questions – to make sure you truly understand the heart of the customer.