Customer Experience Vision

CX Vision

Developing a customer experience vision is the first step in pursuing organizational change for the way your business provides services to its customers. Design and implement your future-state CX vision by developing ideas and prioritizing initiatives. A customer experience vision clarifies these aspirations and why they matter to your customers.

Who Creates Your Customer Experience?

Most companies are structured as if the 5% of the workforce at corporate knows more than the 95% who actually talks to the customers. Of course they don’t articulate that. But look at the last twenty changes to your customer experience. Were nineteen generated directly from the field? Or was it closer to one?

You certainly believe in listening to the customer (or you wouldn’t be reading a blog called “Heart of the Customer!”). But do you have a structured methodology to collect ideas from the field, deliberately test them, and then roll them out? Or do you have the equivalent to the often-ignored suggestion box?

In 2006, when High-Definition TVs were just becoming popular, Best Buy had a problem. Accelerating HDTV sales drove significant growth. But underlying this growth was a huge issue with increasing levels of returns. Customers plugged their new $2,000 TV into their existing $20/month cable hookup, and the resulting picture looked terrible. While the Best Buy associates generally told shoppers about the need to upgrade to high-definition cable, most didn’t listen. So when their picture looked awful, they returned their TV.

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Great Clips – Driving Organic Growth through Customer Focus

“At every level in the organization, if people don’t understand what’s going on face-to-face with the customer, it doesn’t matter what else you’re doing.”

That’s the advice of Rhoda Olsen, CEO of Great Clips. It’s the same strategy that has driven 30 straight quarters of same-salon revenue growth. But it wasn’t always that way. Back in 2005, “We thought we were a pretty customer-focused organization, as everyone does,” says Olsen. But that year sales and customers dipped for the first time in history. This wake-up call showed Great Clips they needed to better understand the current state of their customer needs.

After conducting significant research, they discovered their brand wasn’t very well-defined and category confusion was significant. Customers had a difficult time distinguishing Great Clips’ value proposition from other salons. Read more the full interview, including an analysis of efforts, in Great Clips – Driving Organic Growth through Customer Focus Interview with CEO Rhoda Olsen.