Create Change Through Customer Experience Heroes

What gets measured may get managed, but what gets celebrated gets repeated.

Improving your customer experience requires you to use every tool at your disposal.  Voice of the Customer research is obviously critical.  Understanding your existing Customer Satisfaction Survey or Net Promoter Scores is also important.  But while they monitor your status, these alone will not create change.  You need to find those bright spots in your organization where your customer is being well-served and promote them as much as possible.  You need to create customer experience heroes.

Customer Experience Hero

Heroes define a company, showing what is important.  When a company celebrates sales, they sell more – but perhaps at the expense of delivery issues.  When it celebrates product management, new products come out quickly – including those without customer demand.  But companies with great customer satisfaction use the Voice of the Customer data to understand their level of customer satisfaction, and then celebrates those who engage customers at a superior level. Read more

Tekserve: A Blueprint for a Great B2B Customer-Inspired Experience

“Our job is to make our customers look good to their bosses.” 

That’s the philosophy of Tekserve, an Apple retailer and IT services provider in New York City, as articulated by Director of Marketing Jazmin Hupp.

Imagine that you are a long-time Apple retailer and supplier, and then Apple builds their flagship store just two miles from you, then four more just as close. Some might find it time to close up shop. Instead, Tekserve used the challenge as an opportunity to refocus on their customers. Their reward? Consistent growth, being featured in the Crain’s New York Business Fast 50 and the Computer Reseller News’ 2012 Solution Provider 500 list, which ranks the top technology integrators in North America.

Tekserve doubled-down on the service surrounding Apple’s products, particularly for businesses.  Almost 2/3 of their revenue comes from B2B relationships, where they are far nimbler than Apple. Much of their work involves integrating Apple products into existing networks, including wholesale conversions from PCs to Macs.

Tekserve credits their growth to three main areas of focus: Read more

The First Key to Creating a Great Customer-Inspired Experience

A customer-inspired experience is critical to growth. According to a Temkin Group analysis, a great customer experience increases likelihood to recommend by 19.5% and likelihood to repurchase by 18.4%. And the best way to get that inspiration is through those who talk to customers every day – your front-line employees. In this piece you will receive the first key of creating a great customer-inspired experience. Keys two and three will follow soon!

The First Key to Creating a Customer-Inspired Experience: Identify What Really Matters

This seems like a no-brainer. Companies know what matters to their customers, right?

In fact, many have it wrong. Leaders get so focused on their tangible capabilities that they no longer see through their customers’ eyes, and use their over-informed perspective to prioritize efforts. As a good example, I worked with a global fast food company to determine the best way to increase growth. This company was laser-focused on R&D – inventing the newest menu item to drive that bump in sales. They applied a very rational lens to their customer experience – if we provide good food fast and keep coming up with new items, we’ll grow.

This approach is so alluring that it is no surprise they succumbed to it. And sure enough, the company was rewarded with a spike in sales every time they came out with a new food item. So, like most companies focusing on next quarter’s results, they kept feeding the R&D beast. But despite these sales spikes, their same-restaurant sales continued to drop each year.

We identified a segment of customers who visited their restaurants more than any other. But even within this segment, we found huge discrepancies on monthly spending based on emotional engagement. Read more

Dunn Bros Coffee – the Non-Chain Chain

“Coffee houses are about neigh­bor­hoods,” Dunn Bros Coffee co-CEO Chris Eilers tells me while we drink light roasts and blues music plays overhead.

Dunn Brothers is a popular Midwestern coffee chain with most of its locations in the Twin Cities. The company was started by Ed Dunn and now boasts 83 locations. Whereas Starbucks and Caribou (another Minnesota-grown coffee shop) have primarily corporate-owned locations, Dunn Bros focuses on attracting franchisees, who typically run and work at only one location.

This interview discusses the Dunn Bros Coffee history, how they use their franchisees to develop their unique customer experience, and how the company uses market research and social networking to learn more about their customers. It concludes with an analysis on how they do in creating a customer-inspired experience, as measured through the Heart of the Customer model.

Read the interview in Dunn_Bros-the_Non-Chain_Chain-White_Paper.

Three Customer Experience Surveying Principles

The Heart of the Matter

We need to create a standard for customer satisfaction surveys. In this post, I propose the following Customer Experience Surveying Principles:

  1. Make it short;

  2. If you ask it, use it;

  3. Never ask a question when a query will do.

——————————

A few weeks ago I met with another consultant offering customer satisfaction surveys, although as only a small part of his business. The conversation turned to methodology when he said “I just like to put together a few questions, and get something out there quickly.”

When I showed shock at his cavalier approach, he argued, “What you have to realize is that these companies are not in the business of doing customer satisfaction surveys. They just don’t want to spend much time thinking about it.”

I was offended at the remark, but held my tongue. What I wanted to say was “They’re not in the business of doing accounting, either. Do you suggest they do a similar half-a** job of that, too?” I simply could not believe he argued for such a deliberately casual and careless approach towards a customer-facing effort.

Unfortunately, he is not alone in this disregard towards interrupting customers. Why else do we find so many terrible surveys? He is casually regarding two pillars that I hold dear: My customers and my brand. How you treat the first directly impacts how they see the second. But apparently this viewpoint is unique.

How else do you explain JC Penney’s satisfaction survey question: “Please select the number 2 for this question.” I get it – they want to validate the scientific accuracy of the response. But what does this say about their opinion of their customers? “We don’t think you’re paying attention, so we’re going to ask a question that shows our low opinion of you.”

Read more

Drivers: the Secrets to Creating a Great Customer Experience

The Heart of the Matter

Typical Customer Experience Measurement Programs treat all customers as one homogenous group, rather than as unique segments. These programs need to analyze customers based on their value to the organization and analyze what drives the behavior of each segment. This white paper lays out a process for developing and analyzing these Customer Experience Drivers.

Introduction

Do you understand what motivates your best customers and sets them apart from the rest? For example, why do some customers:

  • Come to your restaurant every week, whereas others only when they have a coupon?
  • Call you first for consulting help, while others make you bid for the lowest price?
  • Require constant hand-holding, compared to others who are very inexpensive to maintain?

And how do you find more customers like the first group?

Simply said, some customers are engaged with your company, love your products and services, and trust you. These customers tend to be your most loyal and profitable. Others buy from you because you are convenient or have a good price. These are often expensive to serve and contribute less to you business’ bottom line. You need to learn what drives the former, to find more like them.

This is true for both B2B and B2C companies. In fact, because the order sizes are typically much larger, this is even more critical for B2B companies.

Without this understanding, product development and marketing become a best-guess effort. Driver Analysis is the process used to determine what motivates your best customers.  It extends your current NPS, Satisfaction, or Engagement studies to discover and measure these underlying motivations.

Driver Analysis is the practice of including motivations in your Customer Experience Measurement Program, then correlating these motivations with your customers’ Lifetime Value. This process separates those who purchase based on convenience or price from those truly profitable customers who view you differently, and then shows the motivations of each group.

For example, quick service restaurant customers selected the chain they visited the most. Within a restaurant’s most-frequent visitors, those who were “engaged” spent $8 a month more here than the average. What drove this engagement was not “the Quality of Food,” or “Speed of Service.” Instead, it was “the Warmth of the Greeting.” Similarly, Gallup found that B2B customers who rated their partners high on “Impacts my business” are stickier – they remain customers longer, and are more profitable. The specific drivers vary by company – even within an industry – but are critical to understand how to motivate customers to spend more with you.

Another reason to use drivers is to target efforts in your different delivery segments. Using the restaurant example above, imagine the situation where a general manager is told her store NPS or satisfaction score is low. While this is important to know, it does not tell her how to improve these scores. Drivers provide insight on where action is needed.

Similarly, drivers help B2B account teams know where to focus. Satisfaction or NPS helps evaluate the state of the relationship – drivers identify how to improve it.

So, how do you discover these drivers? See Figure 1 for an overview. The process starts with your staff, and then expands to your customers.

Figure 1 – Customer Experience Driver Development Path

White Paper

This post continues in: Drivers – the Secret to a Great Customer Experience White Paper. Please download it to learn the entire end-to-end process!

Measuring the Segmented Customer Experience

Segmentation is a critical tool in developing products and marketing offers. Companies routinely separate customers into segments to understand and satisfy their unique needs. So why is segmentation so rarely used when measuring the customer experience?

Some segmentation methods include:

  • Demographic. Best Buy built customer segments such as Jill (the Soccer Mom) or Buzz (the young tech enthusiast), creating successful store offerings around each.
  • Behavioral. Health insurance companies build segmentation schemes around consumer behavior and demographics such as Young and Healthy or Chronics.
  • Psychographic. Can be based on lifestyle, opinions, hobbies, or similar items. Grocery stores use segments such as the Indulgent Shopper and the Convenience Shopper.
  • Geographic. Suburban, rural, and urban are common B2C segments.
  • Industry. Most B2B companies include at least some segmentation around industry.

When conducting a Customer Experience Measurement survey (whether Satisfaction, Net Promoter Score or Engagement), most programs combine all respondents into a consolidated set of results, combining customer segments into a watered-down whole. There are clear logistical reasons to do this – it is easier and cheaper to build one set of results than 3-7. But what is the impact?

>>> Read more in the attached white paper: Measuring the Segmented Customer Experience.  

Measuring the Segmented Customer Experience White Paper

Review of The Ultimate Question 2.0

The Ultimate Question 2.0 (Revised and Expanded Edition): How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven WorldThe Ultimate Question 2.0 (Revised and Expanded Edition): How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven World by Fred Reichheld
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

NPS – opinions vary as to whether it’s the “best” way of measuring your customer engagement. The problem is that the industry is looking for a measurement that works for any industry or company. And such a tool does not exist.

Nevertheless, NPS is a good measurement, and Reichheld lays out how to be successful with the program.

The important thing that the author notes is that NPS does not stand for Net Promoter Score, but Net Promoter System. And it’s this System that is critical. In fact, if you replaced the measurement with Satisfaction, Engagement, Ownership, or your favorite home-brewed system, your business will still see significant growth if you apply the disciplines he outlines in his book.

A good book to get you started with NPS or any system. Highly recommended.

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