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Drivers: the Secrets to Creating a Great Customer Experience

The Heart of the Matter

Typical Customer Experience Measurement Programs treat all customers as one homogenous group, rather than as unique segments. These programs need to analyze customers based on their value to the organization and analyze what drives the behavior of each segment. This white paper lays out a process for developing and analyzing these Customer Experience Drivers.

Introduction

Do you understand what motivates your best customers and sets them apart from the rest? For example, why do some customers:

  • Come to your restaurant every week, whereas others only when they have a coupon?
  • Call you first for consulting help, while others make you bid for the lowest price?
  • Require constant hand-holding, compared to others who are very inexpensive to maintain?

And how do you find more customers like the first group?

Simply said, some customers are engaged with your company, love your products and services, and trust you. These customers tend to be your most loyal and profitable. Others buy from you because you are convenient or have a good price. These are often expensive to serve and contribute less to your business’ bottom line. You need to learn what drives the former, to find more like them.

This is true for both B2B and B2C companies. In fact, because the order sizes are typically much larger, this is even more critical for B2B companies.

Without this understanding, product development and marketing become a best-guess effort. Driver Analysis is the process used to determine what motivates your best customers.  It extends your current NPS, Satisfaction, or Engagement studies to discover and measure these underlying motivations.

Driver Analysis is the practice of including motivations in your Customer Experience Measurement Program, then correlating these motivations with your customers’ Lifetime Value. This process separates those who purchase based on convenience or price from those truly profitable customers who view you differently, and then shows the motivations of each group.

For example, quick service restaurant customers selected the chain they visited the most. Within a restaurant’s most-frequent visitors, those who were “engaged” spent $8 a month more here than the average. What drove this engagement was not “the Quality of Food,” or “Speed of Service.” Instead, it was “the Warmth of the Greeting.” Similarly, Gallup found that B2B customers who rated their partners high on “Impacts my business” are stickier – they remain customers longer, and are more profitable. The specific drivers vary by company – even within an industry – but are critical to understand how to motivate customers to spend more with you.

Another reason to use drivers is to target efforts in your different delivery segments. Using the restaurant example above, imagine the situation where a general manager is told her store NPS or satisfaction score is low. While this is important to know, it does not tell her how to improve these scores. Drivers provide insight on where action is needed.

Similarly, drivers help B2B account teams know where to focus. Satisfaction or NPS helps evaluate the state of the relationship – drivers identify how to improve it.

So, how do you discover these drivers? See Figure 1 for an overview. The process starts with your staff, and then expands to your customers.

White Paper

This post continues in: Drivers – the Secret to a Great Customer Experience White Paper. Please download it to learn the entire end-to-end process!

Review of The Ownership Quotient

The Ownership QuotientThe Ownership Quotient by James L. Heskett, W. Earl Sasser, and Joe Wheeler

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

What if your employees felt like they owned the company? If they were so engaged to be there that they went out of their way to make a difference on a regular basis? Just as importantly, what if your customers felt the same way, and invested the time to help your business grow, giving referrals and great ideas?

These are the central ideas behind The Ownership Quotient. Leading businesses have realized the limitations of satisfaction. Measuring satisfaction does not link to improved business results except at the very low end. The question is: what do we replace it with?

The leading candidate is the Net Promoter Score, which has created great buzz. Other contenders include Emotional Engagement, and Ownership. All do better than satisfaction – which is best depends significantly on your business, and what you are trying to address.

Moving beyond the measurement, though, this book does an excellent job of outlining the steps necessary to increase your customers’ and employees’ sense of ownership in your business. Utilizing case studies from Harrah’s, Apple, Rackspace and others, a philosophy of ownership is outlined that can definitely drive improved business outcomes.

Heskett and company do a great job of showing the limitations of Net Promoter’s one question, capturing the essential emotional nature of ownership. True leaders understand that peak performance requires capturing the hearts of your customers and employees, and this book showcases many best-in-class examples. I particularly like the ING Direct example of how they specifically “fire” customers who do not fit their ideal mode – one of the hardest (yet most impactful) efforts a business can undertake in order to focus on the most engaged and profitable customers.

Driving your employees and customers’ sense of ownership is critical, and this book makes a compelling case, including many great examples used by companies today.

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Surveys – a Force for Good or Evil?

The Internet is a wonderful thing.  With little effort, we can connect to hundreds (or millions!) of people.  That access makes it really easy to conduct surveys.  So easy, in fact, that we no longer have to spend much time thinking about it.  And it’s obvious that many companies don’t.

While a proper survey can teach you about your customers, poor surveys lead you down the wrong path, sacrificing development dollars on delivering something your customers just don’t want.

Survey problems show up in three ways:

  • Asking for opinions instead of using readily available data
  • Outsourcing your thinking to your customers, asking them what you should develop
  • Piling on “just one more question”

Surveys vs. Data

It has now become easier to ask a survey than to do actual research.  Just because you can ask a survey, though, doesn’t mean that you should.

About 18 months ago the financial management website Mint conducted a survey that has been used by a host of speakers purporting to show the huge impact the economy has had on spending habits. One often-used slide:

You can see one presentation using this data at http://slideshare.net/MirrenBizDev/2010-new-business-conference-mintel. This slide is used to show how consumers are abandoning credit cards – 12% discontinued their use in 2009!

Not likely. Can you imagine the ripple effect if one out of every eight consumers completely discontinued the use of credit cards? The fallout would be massive!

The biggest problem is the question Mint asked.  Just because respondents said they discontinued credit cards does not mean they actually did it. Worse, the real data is only a short search away. What was the real change in credit card usage in 2009? According to the Fed, credit cards did decline – but by 0.2%! Yes, this is a dramatic change from the growth of previous years – but nothing like the impact that the Mint survey suggests.

Predicting the Future with Surveys

Survey data are frequently used as input to business decisions. Asking customers what we should develop feels right – but doesn’t work.  Consumers are notoriously bad at predicting what they want. Take this survey by the Consumer Electronics Association. While it’s dated, I saw the waste it generated at a consumer electronics retailer firsthand.

In this survey the CEA asked consumers what content they wanted to watch on their HDTVs. 47% said they wanted to watch home videos, while 44% wanted to view digital photos. This survey was cited in numerous business cases, and the retailer developed dozens of endcaps showing customers how they could do this through adding a computer to their home theater or connecting their Xbox 360 to the computers on their home network. We invested hundreds of thousands of dollars in these displays – likely millions when inventory is considered – yet sold very few.  What went wrong?

You can’t ask customers to predict the future – even their own behavior.  When asked whether they wanted to see their home videos on their computer, almost half the respondents clicked yes. Clicking a Yes box is a far cry from actually purchasing a thousand dollars of equipment and installing it into your home theater.  When it came to actually installing a computer to the home theater, very few were willing to take that step in order to watch their videos of photos.  Predicting the future is always risky business – this survey is just asking for trouble.

Yet, there is some truth to this data. Consumers clearly did want a better way of viewing their home photos. But when compared with the daunting task of getting computer content onto their TV, most took the sensible path of a digital photo frame – much easier, with almost the same result. Surveys are a great way to learn about your customer – but not a great way to learn what they will do.

Question 21.1.2.1

There is also the issue of the rapidly growing survey. Since it’s easy to ask 5 questions, why not 10? 20? Or, in my favorite “Bad Survey” example, why not 45?

This survey is by one of my favorite retailers. But it is a poster child for bad survey design, featuring a total of 45 questions, 40 of which are required. There’s even a question “21.1.2.1!”

When you’re writing a survey, it’s tempting to include everybody’s input. And that’s a good idea. But every question you add results in a few more customers dropping out.  Surveys require discipline:  prune the non-critical items to be sure customers will give you good data on what is left.

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Does this mean that you don’t need surveys? Of course not – well-designed surveys provide critical input. But you need to spend the time to do surveys right. Some tips to success:

  1. Start with the end in mind. What is the #1 thing you need to learn? Is the rest critical? If you need to accomplish two very different things, consider a second survey.
  2. Decide whether a survey is really the right tool. If you want to understand behavior, observational data or behavioral analytics will typically give you much better results.  Surveys are best if you want to compare data over time, or compare results from two different groups.  Just keep in mind that the specific numbers (47% want to watch videos on their TV) are almost certainly wrong.  It’s not about predicting the future – it’s about understanding customer needs.
  3. If a survey is the right tool, determine how much patience your target market has. If it’s a free survey, keep it to no more than 5-7 minutes in length.  This is especially true for satisfaction or NPS surveys – keep these focused on this specific outcome, and use other surveys for market research.
  4. Consider using an expert to help you design the questions. Poorly-phrased questions will give you data – but sometimes customers answer different questions than you think you’re asking. If you cannot afford an expert, at least use an outsider to review what you develop.
  5. Test out the survey first. Have people outside the development team take the survey, and talk to them as they go through it – make sure their understanding of the question matches yours.

While the Internet makes it cheap and easy to do a survey, it also makes it cheap and easy to do crappy work. But if you take the time to do them right, surveys can be an excellent view into the Heart of Your Customer!

– Jim Tincher, Heart of the Customer

Review of The Ultimate Question 2.0

The Ultimate Question 2.0 (Revised and Expanded Edition): How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven WorldThe Ultimate Question 2.0 (Revised and Expanded Edition): How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven World by Fred Reichheld
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

NPS – opinions vary as to whether it’s the “best” way of measuring your customer engagement. The problem is that the industry is looking for a measurement that works for any industry or company. And such a tool does not exist.

Nevertheless, NPS is a good measurement, and Reichheld lays out how to be successful with the program.

The important thing that the author notes is that NPS does not stand for Net Promoter Score, but Net Promoter System. And it’s this System that is critical. In fact, if you replaced the measurement with Satisfaction, Engagement, Ownership, or your favorite home-brewed system, your business will still see significant growth if you apply the disciplines he outlines in his book.

A good book to get you started with NPS or any system. Highly recommended.

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