Employee and Customer Engagement

Best Practices in Employee and Customer Engagement

Employee engagement is about creating an environment where employees know their thoughts and actions and valued. They are trained and educated on a regular basis to maintain their professional development. They are committed to the values and goals of their company and are motivated to do their best each day. What does this have to do with customers? A confident employee makes for a very satisfied customer. Read more below.

The #1 Tool to Engage Your Customers

Note:  This post was originally listed at Annette Franz’s blog at http://cxjourney.blogspot.com/.  If you aren’t subscribed to her blog, you really should consider it!

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You’ve gathered your customer insights and made the changes. Your website is streamlined and easy to use. Your add-on services are perfectly aligned with customer needs. You have invested in the finest training for your employees. Your IT upgrades ensure that your staff has up-to the-second information at their fingertips.

But somehow nothing is changing. Your sales are flat, and your customer experience scores are static. What’s wrong?

Tell me, how good are your line managers?

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The employee-customer interaction is where the magic happens in almost any service-based business. Whether renting a car, shopping for groceries or eating out, the customer-facing associate makes the difference between a ho-hum experience and one that brings you back for more. Read more

Experiment Your Way to Growth

 

High-growth companies discover their opportunities differently. They certainly use strategic planning and analytics, as do most of their competitors. But at their core, they do something else.

Babson Executive Education asked companies their top method to find revenue or cost savings opportunities, then compared that to their growth rates. Whereas low-growth companies tended to favor analytics or strategic planning, over half of high-growth companies focused on experimentation, as shown in the chart on the right.

High-growth companies understand that they can spend endless time debating the latest market research and its implications. They can get teams together for strategic planning off-sites. Or they can leverage the power of their people to quickly experiment to find the best opportunities. Market research and planning are important. But it is the action implicit in experimentation that drives growth. By moving to a culture of experimentation, you can be in your third iteration of an idea before your plodding competitors move the idea out of their planning processes. Read more