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Life Insurance Journey Map

Who’s the Right Customer to Map? Your Third Journey Mapping Question

 

Note: We’re celebrating the upcoming launch of our new book “How Hard Is It to Be Your Customer? Using Customer Journey Mapping to Drive Customer-Focused Change,” by Mapper-In-Chief Jim Tincher and B2B Practice Lead Nicole Newton. We’re using the launch as a cheesy excuse to walk through the Five Journey Mapping Questions.

Two weeks ago, Jim covered “What’s the Business Problem or Opportunity,” and, last week, Nicole introduced the topic of “What is the Right Journey?

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Business and Customer Experience Metrics

If All Customers are Important, You have a Bad B2B Customer Experience

“When all customers are important…none will be.” – Syndrome from The Incredibles (slightly paraphrased)

Are all customers worth the same to your business? No! But odds are, your CX program doesn’t recognize this.

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Journeys are for Action, not Maps

In preparation for the upcoming Customer Contact Week, CCW shared their special report on journey mapping with me. Given our focus and expertise on journey mapping, I’m commonly asked to review these types of reports. Unlike most, however, CCW’s special report truly gets to the heart of the matter – journey mapping is not about creating a map; it’s about driving customer-focused change in your organization.

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So You Want To Make A Journey Map, Part 2: Who Do You Map?

JourneyMaps_Promotion-Pat-1In my last blog post I talked about what journeys you should map when you set out to create journey maps of your customers. But I also mentioned another equally important decision to make when you’re creating your journey maps—not just what to map, but who to map. If you were wondering how to make that decision, look no further—I’ll guide you through the process here.

The first mistake most people make is assuming journey mapping is a “one size fits all” process. But one journey map can’t represent everybody, because different customers have different journeys. Customers are not one monolithic group—they vary by all sorts of factors, such as their goals, product usage, or experience with your category. You need to capture how these factors influence and alter their journeys in your maps.

As an example of how to break down your consumer base by these defining variables, let’s look at three different maps for a health care provider. In this case, the maps are broken down by the customers’ internal motivations, which is the most important factor in how these different consumers interacted differently with the provider. Read more

The First Key to Creating a Great Customer-Inspired Experience

A customer-inspired experience is critical to growth. According to a Temkin Group analysis, a great customer experience increases likelihood to recommend by 19.5% and likelihood to repurchase by 18.4%. And the best way to get that inspiration is through those who talk to customers every day – your front-line employees. In this piece you will receive the first key of creating a great customer-inspired experience. Keys two and three will follow soon!

The First Key to Creating a Customer-Inspired Experience: Identify What Really Matters

This seems like a no-brainer. Companies know what matters to their customers, right?

In fact, many have it wrong. Leaders get so focused on their tangible capabilities that they no longer see through their customers’ eyes, and use their over-informed perspective to prioritize efforts. As a good example, I worked with a global fast food company to determine the best way to increase growth. This company was laser-focused on R&D – inventing the newest menu item to drive that bump in sales. They applied a very rational lens to their customer experience – if we provide good food fast and keep coming up with new items, we’ll grow.

This approach is so alluring that it is no surprise they succumbed to it. And sure enough, the company was rewarded with a spike in sales every time they came out with a new food item. So, like most companies focusing on next quarter’s results, they kept feeding the R&D beast. But despite these sales spikes, their same-restaurant sales continued to drop each year.

We identified a segment of customers who visited their restaurants more than any other. But even within this segment, we found huge discrepancies on monthly spending based on emotional engagement. Read more