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Kris LaFavor Journey Map Designer

Designing Customer Journey Maps: An Interview with Kris LaFavor

We sat down recently to chat with Kris LaFavor, Heart of the Customer’s Data Visualization Designer, about her work designing journey maps.

What do you do when you start the process of designing a customer experience journey map?

It’s important for me to have context before I start. I make sure I understand the background material and information in regards to what the client wants to map and what they’re trying to achieve with the map. This understanding ensures that I’m not mapping extraneous information. The high-level information is plotted out first and hierarchy flows from there. Read more

CX is team sport. Is your whole team playing?

199073871_f559db9436_bYou wouldn’t play soccer without your forwards. You’d never try basketball without guards. So why do so many teams try to win at CX with only a partial team?

At HoC we’ve had the amazing opportunity to work with all kinds of companies: non-profits, retailers, insurance companies, you name it. The one consistency is a tendency to under-invite teams critical to success.

Three specific groups are often left out – IT, HR and those who “don’t get it.”

Breaking it Down

Let’s start with IT.  I get it. As a former IT leader, I can say we’re not always the most fun to partner with. We can get defensive, or we start “solutioning” before we’ve heard from customers. Read more

Review of The Ownership Quotient

The Ownership QuotientThe Ownership Quotient by James L. Heskett, W. Earl Sasser, and Joe Wheeler

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

What if your employees felt like they owned the company? If they were so engaged to be there that they went out of their way to make a difference on a regular basis? Just as importantly, what if your customers felt the same way, and invested the time to help your business grow, giving referrals and great ideas?

These are the central ideas behind The Ownership Quotient. Leading businesses have realized the limitations of satisfaction. Measuring satisfaction does not link to improved business results except at the very low end. The question is: what do we replace it with?

The leading candidate is the Net Promoter Score, which has created great buzz. Other contenders include Emotional Engagement, and Ownership. All do better than satisfaction – which is best depends significantly on your business, and what you are trying to address.

Moving beyond the measurement, though, this book does an excellent job of outlining the steps necessary to increase your customers’ and employees’ sense of ownership in your business. Utilizing case studies from Harrah’s, Apple, Rackspace and others, a philosophy of ownership is outlined that can definitely drive improved business outcomes.

Heskett and company do a great job of showing the limitations of Net Promoter’s one question, capturing the essential emotional nature of ownership. True leaders understand that peak performance requires capturing the hearts of your customers and employees, and this book showcases many best-in-class examples. I particularly like the ING Direct example of how they specifically “fire” customers who do not fit their ideal mode – one of the hardest (yet most impactful) efforts a business can undertake in order to focus on the most engaged and profitable customers.

Driving your employees and customers’ sense of ownership is critical, and this book makes a compelling case, including many great examples used by companies today.

View all my reviews

Creating a great customer experience at Hawaiian Airlines

I ran across this great article on creating an outstanding customer experience at Hawaiian Airlines:  http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2011/11/to_win_customers_get_out_of_th.html

I particularly like his three requirements to maintain an unbeatable customer experience:
1) Get very close to their customer;
2) Benchmark against itself on a consistent basis, and
3) Empower employees to address the unexpected.

#1 and #2 are quite common.  But it’s #3 that I particularly like, because it helps you avoid over-managing the experience.  When you hire the right people, you can train and empower them to delight the customer without having to over-manage the experience.

What are your three rules?