Surveys & Feedback

Customer Experience Surveys & Feedback

Customer experience surveys are powerful tools that allow you to gather data about customers’ opinions and feedback about their personal experience with your brand. The insights gained from these surveys can be invaluable, within limits and when utilized appropriately. They provide data that can help identify what matters most to your customers, reveal problem areas, and highlight opportunities for growth and development.

Creating an effective customer experience survey is about more than asking “how likely are you to recommend this business?” It’s about gathering key insights, and most importantly, showing customers you value their feedback by taking acting on the results.

NPS Pop-Ups—Low-Cost, Yet Low-Quality

Jean Fasching, Lead Consultant

This is a guest post written by one of our very own Lead Consultants, Jean Fasching. 

A friend of mine who’s new to NPS research recently shared that she was frustrated with the response rate (less than 1% of those asked) from a B2B, NPS (Net Promotor Score) question recently added to her company’s website. Executives dictated the addition as a low-cost and efficiency method to get at NPS. So, to keep it simple, she had it added as a one-question pop-up for every “n” visitor to their home page.

She was frustrated at the low response rate, especially to a one-question survey—it was as simple as it could get, so what could she do to get more responses? As we chatted, I mentioned a low response rates (let’s say, below 3%) for the clear majority of website surveys is a common issue, and I’ve only seen good response rates (let’s say above 10% – 50%) using pop-up website surveys in a very few instances. Read more

Your Quest for Survey Data May Be Hurting Your Company

One thing we CX-ers have in common: we love our metrics. Go to any CX conference, and the room that’s filled to overflowing is probably talking about metrics.

Metrics are comfortable for us. Whether we’re talking Net Promoter Score, Customer Effort Score, or good old customer satisfaction, survey metrics give us something to share with the business. Even better, in a role that is so focused on intangibles, we have one tangible thing we can point to.

Of course, to get these metrics we need surveys. Lots of surveys. Long relationship surveys, short (but frequent) transactional surveys, and medium-length touchpoint surveys. More data to analyze and report. We need to feed the beast.

I recently ran across some research that suggests that the continuing search for these metrics may actually be hurting your company. Read more

Behavioral Economics Explains Why Your Surveys are Flawed 

 

Daniel Kahneman isn’t known as a customer experience (CX) guru. A Nobel Prize winner, sure. Brilliant psychologist and leader in behavioral economics, yes. Author of a fascinating (but really dense) book? You bet. But he’s not really known for his CX chops. 

Yet, one of his findings shows why many surveys – as well as quite a bit of other CX research – is flawed from the beginning.  Read more

Your CX Scorecard is Probably Measuring the Wrong Thing

“The purpose of a business is to create and keep a customer.” – Peter Drucker

I love that quote. In one short sentence, Drucker summarizes what a business – and customer experience (CX) – is all about. But despite that wisdom, companies continue to focus primarily on creating customers, often forgetting that keeping them is the way to organic growth. And when they do focus on keeping customers, the focus is all too often on trying to trap them – requiring a phone call to cancel (I’m looking at you, TiVo and Comcast), or requiring contracts that assess fees to leave (Comcast, you again).

Jeannie Bliss has been beating this drum for years. We need to listen to her. What matters is new customers minus attrition, plus how much those customers spend with you. Everything else is just window dressing. Read more

Driving Change Through Journey Mapping

Too much journey mapping is done in an intuitive manner. Which is why half of all journey maps fail to drive action. We surveyed over 100 practitioners and vendors to learn the best practices, and published them in this white paper. You can see a summary in the attached infographic. Look for this year’s journey mapping survey to go out next month!

Customers + Bad Math = Worse Strategy 

There’s something that always bugged me about how people present their customer scores – whether satisfaction, NPS, Customer Effort, or anything else. 

There are really two primary approaches to this reporting: 

  1. Give an average (4.65 out of 5, for example) 
  1. Give the % of top box (5 out of 5, 9 or 10 out of 10) or Top-2 Box (4 or 5 out of 5) 

From what I can tell, nobody really thinks about this. They just do what’s traditional. If a vendor reports one way to one customer, they report this same way to ALL customers. As if everybody’s customers react the same way, and all points in the scale matter the same. 

But that’s not true.  Read more

Your business doesn’t really care if your customers are likely to recommend you 

And neither should you.  Read more

CX is about action. Is Market Research?

Three years ago, Nicole Newton (then Director of Customer Experience with Thomson Reuters, now at Heart of the Customer) spoke at a Market Research Association (MRA) conference. The topic was “Moving from Insights to Action,” about making the move from Market Research to Customer Experience (CX), as we both recently had.

Big Transition, New Focuses

The biggest change we discussed was that in traditional market research you’re expected to develop a clear report that shows the research results and the insights generated from the work, and then you’re done.

When we moved to CX, the rules changed. We still needed to do thorough research and generate insights. But CX requires you to go further, and drive customer-focused change. Read more

Patients want choices, but that doesn’t mean they want to choose

I recently interviewed a specialty health care practitioner on behalf of a health device manufacturer. My client identified him as being less successful in equipping his patients with their device.

We walked through the patient experience, from scheduling to the welcome and the examination. He shared his passion for his work, and how great it felt when he was able to help his patients. He loved his job, and it showed.

But according to my client, he was far less successful at actually getting his patients to get the product that would improve their well-being.

Where was the problem?

We continued to discuss how the appointments typically end. “Once we determine the need for [device], I give my patients brochures for several different manufacturers, and tell them to go home and read them, then to let me know which one they want.”

Bingo. Read more

It Takes a Broad Team to Improve Customer Journeys

I recently participated in a round table sponsored by Barclaycard Business discussing the importance to e-commerce businesses to plan and understand their customer journeys. You can read more about the round table here.

We discussed numerous topics. But one we agreed upon was the need to simplify the experience. Customers aren’t willing to figure out your site – if it’s not easy, they’ll abandon their purchase.

You might think this is a no-brainer. But, if so, why do we still have websites that make it hard to buy, with buried “Buy” buttons, or page after page of information required before completing the transaction? If we all want to make the journey easier, why are so many still so difficult? Read more