Customer Experience Surveys

What is a Customer Experience Survey and How Can it Help My Business?

Customer experience surveys allow us to gather data regarding customers’ opinions and perspectives about their personal experience with your business. The insights gained from these surveys are invaluable, as they provide data that can help identify what matters most to the customer. They unveil problem areas and highlight areas for further growth and development. A customer experience survey is a powerful tool. Creating a customer experience survey is about more than asking how “likely are you to recommend this business?” It’s about asking the right questions and showing you value your customer’s feedback. Learn more below.

Stop Bribing Your Employees for Good NPS Scores

We’re early in Customer Experience (CX) capability development, and I absolutely love it! We’re discovering the best practices that our successors will take for granted; “of course that’s how you do it.”

Unfortunately, being in this early stage means that some “best practices” aren’t. Some actually hinder the goal of improved CX – to create loyal customers who love your brand and come back time and again.

One “best practice” that can create a terrible customer experience is paying employees to achieve good NPS, or Customer Satisfaction, scores. This needs to stop.

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Move to the Top Levels of the Gartner CX Pyramid with Journey Mapping

Last week I discussed Gartner’s CX Pyramid and its approach to evaluating your customer experience. Yesterday’s post discussed how to use journey mapping to help you move up the first three levels. Today, I’ll talk about using journey mapping to move to the top of the pyramid – the Proactive and Evolution levels.

Getting to these levels requires significantly more investment in both customer insights and design. Interviews – particularly in-person at your customer’s site – are good ways to help you in the lower stages, but here it requires deeper methodologies to truly understand your customers’ needs. Read more

Moving up Gartner’s CX Pyramid with Journey Mapping

Last week I wrote about the Gartner CX Pyramid, an interesting maturity model. This week I’ll go into how to use journey mapping best practices to move up the model based on Gartner’s description of the model on their public website.

Selecting the right journey mapping approach requires you to understand where you are on the model and where you aspire to be. An inaccurate assessment will create waste; attempting to create a Proactive-level approach with only a Communication-level infrastructure will be expensive and ultimately frustrate customers instead of creating loyalty. Similarly, using a lower-level approach won’t have sufficient impact with higher-level design capabilities. Journey mapping doesn’t exist in a vacuum – it requires enough staffing and leadership to implement the changes that come out of it. Read more

Journey mapping tools don’t address the most critical challenges.

There are a ton of journey mapping tools out there. I’m most familiar with Touchpoint Dashboard, but I’ve had demos from many others. They all excel at certain components of journey mapping, but they don’t (and probably can’t) address some of the largest problems.

That’s because the biggest reasons journey maps fail have nothing to do with digital problems; they’re analog. As we’ll discuss tomorrow, the biggest problem in journey mapping is that it’s done in silos. Small teams are created to do journey mapping. Those small teams intimately learn the customer experience, but because they don’t control the critical touch points, the effort fails to drive change.

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Too many see journey mapping as an employee workshop.

What is journey mapping?

That may seem like a strange question from a blogger whose title is “Mapper-In-Chief,” but there’s so much confusion on the topic that it’s a question that needs to be asked.

This confusion is fueled by vendors who offer “journey mapping workshops.” This is a half- or full-day workshop where you gather a bunch of employees who each adopt a customer persona and use Post-It Notes to document your perceptions of that customer’s journey. Oracle hosts this type of workshop, and by all accounts it’s a ton of fun. It’s possible they mention the need to actually talk with customers, but the attendees I’ve spoken to don’t remember them saying that.

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We still have challenges navigating trade-offs when deciding what to map.

Most journey mapping projects fail to drive change. That’s what we discovered when we surveyed practitioners who have conducted such projects (learn more about this survey in our white paper, “Driving Change Through Journey Maps”).

One leading success factor is selecting the right journey to map, and it’s the first place that problems occur because it requires trade-offs. Do you want an end-to-end map or one of a specific sub-journey?

An end-to-end map is interesting. Seeing the customers’ journey from beginning to end helps us to understand where the points of friction are and helps prioritize places where issues need to be fixed. Unfortunately, that end-to-end view isn’t always the best way to improve the customer experience.

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Do you have what it takes to succeed at CX?

Have you taken a look at our latest whitepaper? Also accessible from the resources page, it details strategies and insights for ensuring that your next CX initiative is a successful one that will pay for itself with opportunities for profit and growth.

Access it here: How to Select a CX Platform for Maximum Impact


Interested in workshops? Read more here.

Interested in journey mapping? Read more here.

Interested in improving your CX? Read more here.

NPS Pop-Ups—Low-Cost, Yet Low-Quality

Jean Fasching, Lead Consultant

This is a guest post written by one of our very own Lead Consultants, Jean Fasching. 

A friend of mine who’s new to NPS research recently shared that she was frustrated with the response rate (less than 1% of those asked) from a B2B, NPS (Net Promotor Score) question recently added to her company’s website. Executives dictated the addition as a low-cost and efficiency method to get at NPS. So, to keep it simple, she had it added as a one-question pop-up for every “n” visitor to their home page.

She was frustrated at the low response rate, especially to a one-question survey—it was as simple as it could get, so what could she do to get more responses? As we chatted, I mentioned a low response rates (let’s say, below 3%) for the clear majority of website surveys is a common issue, and I’ve only seen good response rates (let’s say above 10% – 50%) using pop-up website surveys in a very few instances. Read more

Your Quest for Survey Data May Be Hurting Your Company

One thing we CX-ers have in common: we love our metrics. Go to any CX conference, and the room that’s filled to overflowing is probably talking about metrics.

Metrics are comfortable for us. Whether we’re talking Net Promoter Score, Customer Effort Score, or good old customer satisfaction, survey metrics give us something to share with the business. Even better, in a role that is so focused on intangibles, we have one tangible thing we can point to.

Of course, to get these metrics we need surveys. Lots of surveys. Long relationship surveys, short (but frequent) transactional surveys, and medium-length touchpoint surveys. More data to analyze and report. We need to feed the beast.

I recently ran across some research that suggests that the continuing search for these metrics may actually be hurting your company. Read more

Behavioral Economics Explains Why Your Surveys are Flawed 

 

Daniel Kahneman isn’t known as a customer experience (CX) guru. A Nobel Prize winner, sure. Brilliant psychologist and leader in behavioral economics, yes. Author of a fascinating (but really dense) book? You bet. But he’s not really known for his CX chops. 

Yet, one of his findings shows why many surveys – as well as quite a bit of other CX research – is flawed from the beginning.  Read more