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Jim Tincher

Listen to The CX Show Podcast

I had the opportunity to join The CX Show, with SaleMove co-founder and CEO, Dan Michaeli. Here’s their summary:

Jim defines customer experience as the overall experience customers have with you across all touchpoints and even beyond. It typically begins in the call center and extends to the company website, apps, your sales representatives, your advertising, and all the different touchpoints a business has with their customers. To take it a step further, Jim says that customer experience is broader than just the deliberate interactions a customer has with a brand, it includes everything that impacts your business, including backend policies. In other words, the perception of the company through the customer’s eyes is also part of the experience.

One particular project that was highlighted in the podcast was Jim’s work with Meridian Health (now Hackensack Meridian Health). The problem that Meridian was facing was understanding the advanced radiology journey (CT scans, ultrasounds, and MRIs) and what that looked like. They wanted to improve that experience in order to build more customer loyalty, because the patients loved the hospital itself, but they were not necessarily choosing them for radiology. Once Jim and Heart of the Customer had worked out a customer journey map with Meridian, the hospital was able to implement a system where they let their patients voice their concerns and opinions and encourage them to take the wheel on their own personal journeys.

When asked about the future of customer experience, Jim said he believes that the future of CX is not surveys or NPS, but instead, it is better internalizing your customers’ emotions and linking that back to the business. In addition, the future of CX is really about action, rather than focusing on reporting information, businesses need to be driving action to improve the overall customer experience.

If you’re interested in learning more about the customer journey mapping experience at Meridian Health, you can listen to our full podcast here!

Your Quest for Survey Data May Be Hurting Your Company

One thing we CX-ers have in common: we love our metrics. Go to any CX conference, and the room that’s filled to overflowing is probably talking about metrics.

Metrics are comfortable for us. Whether we’re talking Net Promoter Score, Customer Effort Score, or good old customer satisfaction, survey metrics give us something to share with the business. Even better, in a role that is so focused on intangibles, we have one tangible thing we can point to.

Of course, to get these metrics we need surveys. Lots of surveys. Long relationship surveys, short (but frequent) transactional surveys, and medium-length touchpoint surveys. More data to analyze and report. We need to feed the beast.

I recently ran across some research that suggests that the continuing search for these metrics may actually be hurting your company. Read more

Your CX Scorecard is Probably Measuring the Wrong Thing

“The purpose of a business is to create and keep a customer.” – Peter Drucker

I love that quote. In one short sentence, Drucker summarizes what a business – and customer experience (CX) – is all about. But despite that wisdom, companies continue to focus primarily on creating customers, often forgetting that keeping them is the way to organic growth. And when they do focus on keeping customers, the focus is all too often on trying to trap them – requiring a phone call to cancel (I’m looking at you, TiVo and Comcast), or requiring contracts that assess fees to leave (Comcast, you again).

Jeannie Bliss has been beating this drum for years. We need to listen to her. What matters is new customers minus attrition, plus how much those customers spend with you. Everything else is just window dressing. Read more

Customers + Bad Math = Worse Strategy 

There’s something that always bugged me about how people present their customer scores – whether satisfaction, NPS, Customer Effort, or anything else. 

There are really two primary approaches to this reporting: 

  1. Give an average (4.65 out of 5, for example) 
  1. Give the % of top box (5 out of 5, 9 or 10 out of 10) or Top-2 Box (4 or 5 out of 5) 

From what I can tell, nobody really thinks about this. They just do what’s traditional. If a vendor reports one way to one customer, they report this same way to ALL customers. As if everybody’s customers react the same way, and all points in the scale matter the same. 

But that’s not true.  Read more

Your business doesn’t really care if your customers are likely to recommend you 

And neither should you.  Read more

Are Your New Customer NPS Scores Low? Here’s Why

It’s not unusual for new customers to have lower scores than expected—but it can seem counter-intuitive. After all, they just selected your company – why are they so low? You’ve gone through and removed barriers, but your customers aren’t showing the love.

It might not be what you’ve done. The problem may be their reference point.

The more time you spend in a company, the more your perspective shifts. We all try to maintain the “beginner’s mind,” where we see things as if they were fresh.

But here’s the thing. Your customers don’t really have a beginner’s mind, either. They don’t actually judge your experience on its own merits, but by a separate reference point – one you might be aware of.  Read more

Four steps to build an improved B2C customer experience

shopping-cart-1275480_640Serving consumers is different than serving businesses.  It’s not harder or easier – just different.  I’ve seen real challenges in the past when leaders move from B2B to B2C (or vice-versa). Here are four steps to help you get started creating a better B2C customer experience.

1. Know your customer experience (CX) goal.

I was talking with a CX leader, and asked about her customer experience vision. She responded, “We want to be the simplest, and the most flexible. Oh, and we need to keep costs low.”

That’s a pretty hard combination to hit. In fact, I’d argue it’s pretty impossible to hit all three.

Your goal should flow from your vision. Are you trying to be the easiest company to work with, the one with the closest relationships, the most flexible?  Understanding your company’s goals is the first step to creating your approach. If you don’t know where you’re going, you don’t know what steps to take next.  Read more

John Deere – not your father’s tractor company

John Deere PresentationI was interested in seeing Erin Wallace’s presentation at last week’s CXPA Insights Exchange, but I had no idea just how cool it would be. Her presentation was titled “Easier Said than Done: Move the Needle with Your Customer Experience Strategy,” and showed a very comprehensive approach towards customer experience that we can all learn from.

When I work with clients, I tell them there are 3+2 areas you need to focus on to develop a world-class customer experience program. The first three are an identified leader, as shared vision and governance. Erin nailed all three. She’s obviously the leader of the effort, so didn’t spend a lot of time there. But the strategy and governance were critical.

One difference between John Deere and many companies is their longevity. They’re not just out to win your loyalty today – they want to win your grandchildren’s loyalty. Erin quickly summed up this strategy when she said, “Our goal is to earn customers for generations.” They clearly didn’t just take an Amazon or Zappos strategy and go with it – this is unique to John Deere, and this strategy is critical to their entire program.  Read more

“Customer experience is all about culture change”: An interview with Mark Smith

Mark Smith 2014How do you create change when you’re the first customer experience (CX) leader at a highly successful business with a history of customer focus?

That’s the challenge Mark Smith faced when he became GE Capital Fleet Services’ first Vice President of Customer Experience a year ago. His response? Focus on the culture, because that’s what will sustain your experience.

Fleet Services’ primary customers are fleet managers who outsource some or all of their fleet management to the company. But they also have a B2C-like relationship with the drivers of those vehicles, who contact the company for everything from password resets to maintaining their vehicles. To build a customer-focused culture, Mark focuses on Listening, Sharing and Collaborating. Read more

What the heck IS loyalty, anyway?

Is it your Net Promoter Score (NPS)? Customers who say they’re likely to purchase again? Some other survey metric?

Or is it something else.

If you spend as much time reading customer experience (CX) reports as I do, you might pick up on a theme. Many of us actually believe that if a customer says they’ll purchase more from us, then they actually will. So we call that loyalty.
Read more