Posts

Customer Effort Score 2 – Is it easy?

Loyalty impact of support callsEffort is the bane of your customer experience. Or, as I like to say, “Thinking is bad.” But is customer effort the right measurement to use?

First, an overview. The CEB created the Customer Effort Score (CES) as a transactional measurement. You can see my early post here. Its original phrasing was “How much effort did you personally have to put forth to handle your request?” and a lot of blogs still point to this confusing phrase. Luckily, the CEB reworded it to “The company made it easy for me to handle my issue” in the CES 2.0.

Unfortunately, they haven’t taken the next step to call it the Customer Easy Score, which is much more fun to say. Read more

customer service letter

The future of surveys? Maybe no surveys at all

scan0002Ending the tale of being rear-ended, I found another great lesson. Geico took care of my car, having ABRA Auto Body put on a brand-new bumper. As I checked out, ABRA gave me a document to “help” me fill out my survey. Yes, they told me exactly how I should fill out my questions!

Perhaps this shouldn’t surprise me. We’ve all heard of car salespeople, retail employees and restaurant staff who game the system. But to actually create a document telling me how to fill out the scores was a new one!

Now combine gaming with survey fatigue. So many of us are becoming customer-obsessed, that we each send out more and more surveys. Each individual survey isn’t bad, but I can no longer go through a day without at least one survey request. Our local paper had a great column talking about the survey experience here.

Maybe it’s time to start thinking about the post-survey world.  What would you do if you could never use a 10-point scale again? Read more

What do you do when your CEO doesn’t believe in CX?

CEOLast year I interviewed a customer experience leader for my blog. During the interview this person had a basic assumption that the CEO was completely bought into the CX program. So I finally stopped and asked, “What do you do when your CEO isn’t on board? How do you get him or her to believe in the business case?” This question caught my interviewee by surprise, as they obviously hadn’t spent any time thinking about this question. After a few seconds, the response was, “Well, then you quit, and go somewhere else where the CEO is on board.”

Of course, this isn’t an option for all CX aspiring and current leaders. We’re dealing with senior leadership at various levels of support and engagement. So I asked some of my CX practitioner friends what they would do. Most were unwilling to go on record, but two did respond with materials I could share. Read more

Create Better Customer Outcomes through Journey Mapping Workshops

This post was originally shared through the ICMI (International Customer Management Institute) newsletter. You can view the original version here.

—————-

Call center managers have seen it before. Customers form an expectation from your sales channel or marketing literature, receive a different experience through operations, and then call your contact center where they may receive a third perspective.

It’s the setup for a rough call, and an even rougher customer experience. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

Great companies have found a way to create a consistent end-to-end experience. They align their silos, creating a consistent experience from start to finish. How do they do it?

Enter customer journey mapping.

Customer journey mapping is a series of techniques that map out your customer experience from start to finish. It follows your customer across silos as they go from initial awareness through the sales process into ongoing engagement.

A popular way to conduct journey mapping is through a workshop. Read more

Add Measurements to Your Customer Experience Metrics

I led the “Developing Customer-Focused Metrics to Drive Your Customer Experience (B2B)” Unwound Sharing Session at last week’s CXPA Insights Exchange. This was a session where participants shared what’s working for them.

As we shared our best practices, one member pointed out how we were all focusing on metrics – questionnaire-based responses from customers. And sure enough, most of the debate revolved around whether to use Net Promoter Score, the Loyalty Index, satisfaction, or another survey-based metric.  This makes sense – we often have a budget for this type of work, and this is one of the few areas where the customer experience team may actually have some control.  So it’s what we typically use to gauge how our customer experience is doing.

And what’s wrong with that?  Nothing by itself. Except that these measurements can feel disconnected for your teams that are trying to deliver a great customer experience. Telling teams to improve their Net Promoter Score is equivalent of telling managers to make their employees happier.  Both are good goals, but neither gives any direction about how to do it. Read more

The Metrics that Matter – Does Measuring Customer Satisfaction Pay?

Heart of the Customer's Customer Experience ModelWhat’s your top customer experience priority? If you’re like most of the 290 respondents to the Temkin Group’s survey of customer experience professionals, “customer experience measurement and metrics” are a big priority. 81% said they expect to put more effort into this area next year, with 79% putting more effort into “customer insights and analytics,” and 73% doing more around their “voice of the customer program.”

Effective metrics are central to a Customer Intelligence program, your first step in creating a great customer experience. This is the first of a series of articles to discuss popular relationship metrics and whether they might make sense for your business. We’ll start with that old standby, satisfaction.

In this series I’m focusing on relationship metrics – those once-a-year measurements that are not part of a transaction. Customer satisfaction is a great measurement to use when measuring a transaction or touch point – but when does it make sense to use it for measuring the strength of your customer relationship? Read more

Does your customer or employee come first? Answer: Yes

iStock_000025403053XXLargeThis is a question that my fellow bloggers love to debate – do you focus on customers to drive change, or prioritize employee engagement to develop a sustainable customer-focused culture?

This continues my review of the 2013 Temkin Award Winners and how they match the Heart of the Customer model. As I reviewed the award winners, it quickly becomes obvious that this really isn’t an either/or question.  Both are critical to success. Let’s look at how three award winners drive both employee and customer engagement. Read more

“No, Bill. You don’t want wider seats.”

At a recent dinner party I explained what I do for a living. One attendee responded, “Well, then can you please call Delta, and tell them I want wider seats?”

I responded, “Actually, you don’t.  People say they want wider seats, but their behavior says that they really don’t.”

“Oh, you mean the hypothetical general public doesn’t want wider seats?”

“No, Bill.”  I responded. “I mean that you specifically don’t want wider seats.”

—————-

Surveys Don’t Tell the Full Story

The problem with many customer experience surveys is that they recommend the equivalent of “make my seats wider.” It’s a common practice to ask customers to rate importance for different factors, then compare that to satisfaction. But it just doesn’t work.  Since you measure each item in isolation, everything is free.  And so there’s nothing to ensure that respondents’ answers match their actual behaviors. Expensive things like wider seats have just as much weight as free peanuts.

To show what I mean, let’s play this out.  I call Delta and somehow find the magical IVR prompts to reach the right person. She hears my plea and responds, “My goodness – you’re right!  We’ve been looking at this wrong! We’ll fix that immediately.”  So they remove one chair from each row to allow for wider seats.  What will happen? Will travelers flock to Delta to take advantage of the space?

Read more

Real-World Customer Experience Stories – Isolating What Really Matters

Heart of the Customer's Customer Experience ModelThe Real-World series continues.  In these posts I’m sharing how the 2012 Temkin Customer Experience Award finalists actually go about building their customer experiences.

The first two posts focused on how the respondents create Customer Intelligence – the first stage of the Heart of the Customer’s Customer Experience Model.  We started with Bringing Your Customers to Life, and continued with Identifying the Metrics that Matter.

Now we move into the Customer-Based Capabilities stage of the model, specifically Isolating What Really Matters.  This stage goes beyond the relationship metric that matter to find the drivers that actually impact your customer.  Rather than telling your managers to focus on improving your Net Promoter or Satisfaction scores, you discover what factors actually drive those scores.  You can see more detail here. Read more

Real-World Stories of Creating the Metrics that Matter

Heart of the Customer's Customer Experience ModelThis week we continue to analyze the Temkin Group’s finalists for their 2012 Customer Experience Excellence Award to learn how they build Customer Intelligence.

Whereas last week I outlined how the companies bring their customers to life for their employees. This week I delve into determining the Metrics that Matter – the second component of Customer Intelligence.

I wrote before about how The Perfect Customer Experience Score is not universal – it varies for each company. Great organizations do not just plug in the Net Promoter Score or satisfaction because they heard they’re great measurements – they take the time to discover whether the scores actually predict important outcomes such as client loyalty. NPS may or may not be the right score. Superior companies test to see if improving NPS improves their customers’ loyalty. If not, then NPS is not a Metric that Matters for your company. Read more