CX vision

Customer Experience Vision

Developing a customer experience vision is a necessary first step in pursuing an organizational change in the way your business provides services to its customers. A customer experience vision defines these aspirations and why they matter to your customers. Learn more below.

Delight your customers – but only if they want to be delighted

Delight your customers, or make it easy for them? How do we reconcile two popular CX books with opposite conclusions – The Effortless Experience vs. The Power of Moments?

Consultancy CEB is the driver behind The Effortless Experience. They conducted thousands of surveys after service calls across multiple industries, and this research led to a clear message: delighting customers doesn’t create loyalty –  consistent delivery and easy experiences do. The book offers compelling research to back this up, showing why you need to reduce effort in your service experience. It’s a great read, and I highly recommend it. This book also introduces the second version of the Customer Effort Score, which is their preferred way to measure transactions. According to the CEB, companies earn the most loyalty when they move customers from a low to a moderate score.

The Power of Moments is another great book, and I included a Q&A of the authors here. They use data from rival consultancy Forrester to come to the opposite conclusion – that it’s most important to delight your customers. Forrester similarly conducted thousands of surveys across multiple industries to show that companies receive disproportionate levels of loyalty when they delight customers. According to Forrester, companies earn the most loyalty when they move customers from a moderate to a high Customer Effort score.

Wait, what? How can both be true? Read more

Listen to The CX Show Podcast

I had the opportunity to join The CX Show, with SaleMove co-founder and CEO, Dan Michaeli. Here’s their summary:

Jim defines customer experience as the overall experience customers have with you across all touchpoints and even beyond. It typically begins in the call center and extends to the company website, apps, your sales representatives, your advertising, and all the different touchpoints a business has with their customers. To take it a step further, Jim says that customer experience is broader than just the deliberate interactions a customer has with a brand, it includes everything that impacts your business, including backend policies. In other words, the perception of the company through the customer’s eyes is also part of the experience.

One particular project that was highlighted in the podcast was Jim’s work with Meridian Health (now Hackensack Meridian Health). The problem that Meridian was facing was understanding the advanced radiology journey (CT scans, ultrasounds, and MRIs) and what that looked like. They wanted to improve that experience in order to build more customer loyalty, because the patients loved the hospital itself, but they were not necessarily choosing them for radiology. Once Jim and Heart of the Customer had worked out a customer journey map with Meridian, the hospital was able to implement a system where they let their patients voice their concerns and opinions and encourage them to take the wheel on their own personal journeys.

When asked about the future of customer experience, Jim said he believes that the future of CX is not surveys or NPS, but instead, it is better internalizing your customers’ emotions and linking that back to the business. In addition, the future of CX is really about action, rather than focusing on reporting information, businesses need to be driving action to improve the overall customer experience.

If you’re interested in learning more about the customer journey mapping experience at Meridian Health, you can listen to our full podcast here!

The ADKAR Change Model and Customer Journey Maps 

Image credit: Prosci.com

The primary reason to run a customer journey mapping project is to drive customer-focused change. That’s what we heard when we asked customer experience practitioners to rate their success with their journey mapping project. A successful journey mapping project is one where change is made from the results. 

Driving change requires a strong model, and at Heart of the Customer we’re fans of Prosci’s ADKAR Change Management Model. ADKAR stands for: 

  • Awareness of the need to change 
  • Desire to change 
  • Knowledge of what and how to change 
  • Ability to change 
  • Reinforcement of the change 

Read more

B2B Companies: Focus on Onboarding First

In any customer experience, certain phases have more impact than others – either positive or negative – and create a measurable impact on the rest of the relationship. Positive results lead to customer who trust you, are more willing to forgive mistakes, and are more interested in your other products or services. But if they don’t go so well, customers are more likely to stray; they pounce on every mistake, and they’re very reticent to use your other offerings.

The moments that matter vary by experience, and even by individual. Effective journey maps show these Moments of Truth. But even if you don’t have a journey map – or if yours just isn’t very good – there’s one area that is consistently important in B2B experiences: The new customer onboarding journey. Read more

Maybe (Just Maybe) There’s Hope for Comcast Yet 

Whenever I’m leading a workshop or giving a keynote, I know I can always get a laugh by putting “Comcast” and “Customer Experience” in the same sentence. 

But that’s way too easy, so I usually skip that line. But last week I saw something that gave me a glimmer of hope for the company. They seem to be learning how to prioritize.  Read more

Not making #CX progress? Start saying no

Too many customer experience (CX) programs get stuck. 

Stuck with no influence. No change. No leadership buy-in. 

We see it all the time. As a CX leader, you’re spread so thin, trying to juggle dozens of balls at once. You’re building a new measurement program while sharing your existing scores with anybody who will listen. You’re creating new training programs. You’re in meetings to support the new portal, the new customer campaign, the Customer Advisory Board, and the new loyalty program. 

You’re incredibly busy. You burn your unused vacation time just trying to keep up. But then you get to the end of the year, and the most important thing – customer loyalty – remains unchanged.  

A year filled with effort. But no actual change. 

That’s a problem.  Read more

Why Your CEO Isn’t Impressed with Your Work 

I wrote last week about why Your CX Scorecard is Probably Measuring the Wrong Thing. Now, on a flight home from a client workshop, I have a chance to catch up on some old reading. And it turns out that your CEO likely agrees. You may not be spending time in the right areas – or, at least, not making that clear to the organization. 

Walker’s The CEO View of CX includes a survey of Business-to-Business Customer Experience (CX) employees. The survey asked them about their CEO’s top areas of focus, and they selected “Competitive advantage” and “Growth, profitability and valuation” as their top two. But when presented with the same list to describe what they were focusing on, the answers were “Identifying what to do AND how to do it,” “Creating a customer-focused culture,” and “Incorporating CX capabilities throughout the org.” The same list, but completely different areas of focus identified. 

Are the two necessarily a mismatch? Of course not. All three areas of CX focus can be building blocks to accomplish the CEO’s goals. However, it’s telling that the CX employees didn’t choose the outcomes, but instead the tasks. And that puts you at risk of being marginalized.  Read more

Your CX Scorecard is Probably Measuring the Wrong Thing

“The purpose of a business is to create and keep a customer.” – Peter Drucker

I love that quote. In one short sentence, Drucker summarizes what a business – and customer experience (CX) – is all about. But despite that wisdom, companies continue to focus primarily on creating customers, often forgetting that keeping them is the way to organic growth. And when they do focus on keeping customers, the focus is all too often on trying to trap them – requiring a phone call to cancel (I’m looking at you, TiVo and Comcast), or requiring contracts that assess fees to leave (Comcast, you again).

Jeannie Bliss has been beating this drum for years. We need to listen to her. What matters is new customers minus attrition, plus how much those customers spend with you. Everything else is just window dressing. Read more

What’s Worse than No CX Vision? Multiple CX Visions

Creating a compelling vision is one of the trickiest aspects of an effective customer experience (CX) program. A solid CX vision aligns teams, allowing your front-line employees to decide how best to serve the customer without needing to escalate. Read more

“I’m new to CX – what do I do?” Seven Steps for the New CX Leader 

One of the pleasures of my role is that I get to meet people new to customer experience (CX). Being a relatively new discipline, CX doesn’t have much bench strength, so we bring in others from other disciplines who have the passion, but not the experience.  

This post is dedicated to those who have a passion for improving their customers’ experience, but aren’t 100% sure where to start. The items below aren’t completely linear—you can’t wait until one is done before you start the next—but they do list a good order in which to begin.  Read more